Akka Streams Camel integration

Akka Streams and Alpakka provide a good an alternative to Apache Camel when integrating different services and data. Alpakka has a rich set of connectors, including file, JMS, Cassandra and more. We can still use Camel endpoints if Alpakka doesn’t provide the connectors.

This post shows a complete example of integrating Camel endpoints with Akka Streams. This example reads file content in one directory, tranforms the content, then writes to another directory. It uses the Camel file endpoint.

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ChatOps journey with Ansible, Hubot, AWS and Windows - Part 3

This is Part 3 of the series of setting up a Chatbot for deploying artifacts to AWS EC2 Windows instances. In this post, I’ll discuss using AWS Lambda to make sure instances are not left running for too long to save money.

The Chatbot makes deployment much easier and encourages developers to run more tests. However, those launched instances are more likely to be left running for a long time. The situation is worse for Windows instances, which are way more expensive that Linux instances ($0.15 comparing to $0.03). So I need a way to terminate those instances when not used.

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ChatOps journey with Ansible, Hubot, AWS and Windows - Part 1

Comparing to DevOps, ChatOps, a word coined by GitHub, is trying to leverage Chatbots to make developers’ life much easier. Comparing to CLI or web pages, ChatBots are more user-friendly to interact with, and bots are COOL!!!

This series of posts takes you through the process of setting up a Chatbot for deploying artifacts to AWS EC2 Windows instances. Tools and services used in this post include:

This series assumes you have basic knowledge of Ansible and Docker. If not, you should start from tutorials for these two.

Update 2018-02-08: Use 7zip to extract tar.gz files.

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Spring 5 WebFlux functional programming model

Spring 5 has the new module WebFlux to create reactive web applications. Spring WebFlux supports two programming models: traditional annotation-based programming model and functional programming model. In this post, we’ll going to scratch the surface of the new functional programming model. This post assumes that you already know concepts like Flux and Mono in Reactor.

We’ll use a calculator service as the example. This service supports operations like add, subtract, divide and multiply with two operands. The parameter operator specifies the operation to call, while parameters v1 and v2 specify the two operands. For example, the url /calculator?operator=add&v1=1&v2=2 invokes the add operation with values 1 and 2.

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